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20130124
20130201
STATION
KQED (PBS) 17
LANGUAGE
English 17
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
PBS
Jan 25, 2013 8:00pm PST
in 1991. extreme environments, brutality, death dirksing. it's uncivilized and women can't do it, nor thank you they even be thought of as doing it. we have come so far and the number one reason is because we have had all of these women in iraq and afghanistan, in these wars, fighting these wars even though not on the official front line and dyeing. 152 women have died in these conflicts, 800 wounded. >> martha, in addition to opening up a lot of jobs, what actually is the practical effect of this? how do they phase it in? are there issues they have to yet resolve once you lift the ban? >> first of all, they're giving this a lot of time. implementation not until the beginning of 2016. you're going to have -- i talked to some young male soldiers who don't like this. it's sort of like this that you heard 20 years ago, we don't want women there. it will ruin the band of brothers. they're going to go slow with this. women will want them to go slow too. they want to do it right. they want the standards to be the same. they want to look at who's qualified for these jobs because they're not
PBS
Jan 27, 2013 3:00pm PST
movement in this country, which is what climate is about, which is but the environment was about what led by who? teddy roosevelt. it was embraced by men like russell train, great republicans. it was a terrific republican sense of leadership. nelson that, the rockefeller. >> richard nixon? >> clean air act. i mean, the man that took the lead out of the air. richard nixon. the man who saved the waters of this country, richard nixon. the last great liberal president this country had. i would just like to see as rise above this pattern -- petty partisan bickering that i hear in this panel. >> this speech laid out the thing that we have to deal with. the things the government has to be involved in. the air, the water goes from state to state, city to city. one place cannot do it. it has to be the business -- the regulation of how you protect with all of that has to be the business of the federal government. >> could i get half a minute of the bottle? cap and trade worked well for acid rain. acid rain stays in our country. i am not against regulated carbon. if you can get china and india to do
PBS
Jan 25, 2013 3:00pm PST
area, have appreciated the goals of our environment and climate change and doing everything that we can. i think the 80%, we're not going to be satisfied with that, spencer. we want 100% zero waste. this is where we're going. >> reporter: is that possible? >> i think it is. it is possible. >> reporter: san francisco residents sven eberlein and debra baida think it's possible, too. they are avid recyclers and composters, so much so that they produce almost no trash. baida lists what goes into the compost bin. >> we put wrappers from our butter, we put any meat or package, that kind of packaged paper food, soiled food wrappings, tissues, q-tips, paper napkins, which we don't have in our home. if those come in, those go there. soiled paper plates, milk cartons. >> i go to travel somewhere, and i'm, you know, i have, like, an apple and "where's the compost?" you know, and i have to throw it in the trash, and it kind of, you know, it just doesn't feel quite right, you know. >> reporter: but not all san franciscans are as enthusiastic as eberlein and baida. those who refuse to sort their garb
PBS
Jan 27, 2013 3:30pm PST
the people who can go in there and live in that kind of environment. >> what does that mean? >> it means it's a much more difficult owe. >> no, what does it mean about the chinese you're talking about? >> they have a huge appetite for the natural resources. >> and we don't? >> oh no, we do, but we have other resources. the fact that this is something that gives them a primary call on a lot of resources of the region. they've put in a lot of money. we haven't been willing to do that. >> we have two reasons for being there. one, africa is a central front with al kay dan. number two, these resources that we really have not been attending to in any fashion resem bling the chinese. >> that's true. >> chinese will deal with anybody. they're right there in the sudan. they will go and deal with anybody. >> they were in africa early. >> they put cash on the barrel head. they're all over latin america, all over africa, john. they are dealing in a commercial mercantile way with these regimes, and we have a foreign policy that deals of of israel. meet yahir lapide. >> a new arrival on the scene is and
PBS
Jan 29, 2013 7:00pm PST
-rate environment and banks effectively being unwilling to lend at these low rates. i think that is a fantastic point for the near term. more long-term, our real worry is about the exit. >> susie: real quickly, i want to ask you about the jobs report that comes out on friday because more people get jobs, it is good for the economy. >> right. >> susie: might there be a surprise that more hiring is going on? >> we do not expect any surprises, at least not any upward surprises. it is interesting, almost over any time bucket over the last year, the average job gain has been about 150,000 mer month. 150,000 -- per month. where the aggregate demand hasn't picked up, companies are not picking up the hiring. we're looking for 150,000 a month, per average. >> susie: that's kind of look warm, but thank you, tom for coming on the show. we've been talking with tom porcelli, chief mist at rbc cap >> tom: despite a strong end to the year, ford stock fell more than 4.5% today. the concern is, ford doesn't think this year will be much better than last year. the auto maker earned 31 cents a share, up from a yea
PBS
Jan 30, 2013 3:00pm PST
and now i'm in a very good environment and there are a lot of things to be done and that i'd like to do so i have to be very engaged. it's a very, very full of things to do and i'm very happy about that. >> suarez: are you able to keep up with events in china as closely as you were when you were doing your human rights work there? >> (translated): there are many ways to get -- to become informed. in a sense, it's easier to be informed here than when i was in china. i'm not saying that in china things cannot be done. what i'm saying is that things can be done from many different angles to promote what we need to promote. >> suarez: well, since you left the country there have been continued arrests of dissidents, suppression of press freedoms with the southern weekly, attempts to control access to the internet. a lot of things are moving along in china. what does it tell you about the government's attitude toward free speech and free thought? >> (translated): i think this only goes to show that the chinese government and the party still wants to control everything and if they keep holding an
PBS
Jan 31, 2013 12:00am PST
, educating kids, having enough jobs, having stability, take care of the environment-- that really becomes a crucial thing and a society can get on a path to be like the u.s. . >> rose: give me an example of what excites you about what we're looking from mapping of the human genome and all the progress made since 2001 when it was announce bide people who had been working on it so hard? >> understanding the genome allows us to begin to understand how life works, including how disease works. so taking, for example, cancer, and saying, okay, that looks like breast cancer but it's-- there's many different types there. so the drugs used to treat it should be custom ides according to that pattern. you're starting to see the payoff on that. if you take plant-- because we can look at their d.n.a.-- we are beginning to understand plant diseases and saying okay how can we allow african farmers not have all these insects and diseases that lower their call the ral productivity to be about a fifth of what we have here in the united states. so the genetic revolution is going to give to us in many, many,
PBS
Jan 24, 2013 12:00pm PST
these two parallel aproaches because it creates an environment where you have a chance to see whether the negotiations between the israelis and the palestinian authority lead somewhere. and maybe that begins to change circumstance but i don't think you can do more than that. >> it does concern me to watch the inaugural address-- as excited i was as a good liberal. i thought it was one of the most liberal inaugural speeches since 1937, the second inaugural of f.d.r., but it was basically a domestic speech. if there's one thing i know about barack obama, having written a biography of him and having some contact with him, the one thing he is cop standpointly asking about when it comes to israeli politics is who is my constituency? in other words, if i am going to spend political capital-- which i have a limited amount of for the collected number of issues i have to deal with for a certain period of time-- who am i appealing to? and that is something that came out ofeate election. it has to be a little more encouraging than it could have been. not enormously but under encouraging than if
PBS
Jan 24, 2013 3:00pm PST
to establish a psychology that in some cases led to that environment. i have to believe the more we can treat people equally, the more likely they are to treat each other equally. >> reporter: the decision comes nearly two and a half years after the repeal of another ban "don't ask, don't tell" which barred gays and lesbians from openly serving in the military. >> ifill: for more on how this came together, and what comes >> brown: still to come on the newshour: confirmation hearings for secretary of state nominee john kerry ... china's growth bubble ... and an online "fireside chat" with vice president biden. but first, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: president obama announced his nominees today to run two key financial regulatory agencies. he tapped mary jo white to chair the securities and exchange commission. she's a former federal prosecutor in new york, with a long record of prosecuting financial fraud and other white- collar crimes. >> if confirmed by the senate, i look forward to committing all of my energies to working with my fellow commissioners a
PBS
Jan 28, 2013 3:00pm PST
wages or in a way that could get a better working environment, then it's okay. if you're not, saying your bored is going to cause some problems. >> especially if you're bored being on twitter and facebook. it depends on the category. the board upheld the filing of a reporter for the arizona daily star who was bored and posted online saying what? no overnight homicide? you're slacking, tucson. well, that was considered not acceptable for his employer at the newspaper. >> bad taste might be a problem. but what about how are companies handling this? are they being forced to expand their policies? i mean how broad does it need to be? >> the n.l.r.b. is actually urging or pushing companies to rewrite their policies so that they're in line with their new series of recommendations. so they're trying to get the cost-cos of the world and other large companies... >> target and general motors among those. >> ... to do it. wal-mart gets an a-plus because wal-mart already rewrote its policies to be more in line with what the n.l.r.b. is say joog what the chairman of the n.l.r.b. is saying is that
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)